Close

Email a Friend

To send this link to someone you know,

please enter the information below and submit.

* Required Field

Please complete all fields to submit

Search

Champions for Change


Champions for Change has been developed and funded by AbbVie Ltd.

first-sign-symptoms-hs

FIRST SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HS

HS is a painful, long-term skin condition that causes recurring boils and abscesses, usually around the armpits, groin, on the buttocks and under the breasts.1,2

You might find the following resource useful:

WHAT IS HS?
Provides an overview of what HS is, including the symptoms of the condition.

seeing-gp-about-ur-symptoms

SEEING A GP ABOUT YOUR SYMPTOMS

If you think you may have HS, it is important that you go and see your GP as soon as possible for an accurate diagnosis.

It is important to prepare for your GP appointment and share as much information with them as possible. This will help the GP to either make an accurate diagnosis, or to help them refer you to an appropriate specialist to make a diagnosis.

You might find the following resource useful:

SEEING A GP ABOUT HS
Helps you prepare for a consultation with your GP and what you can expect at appointments with your GP, whether they are held prior to a diagnosis or once you've been diagnosed with HS.

seeing-specialist-about-hs

SEEING A SPECIALIST ABOUT HS

HS can sometimes be difficult to diagnose as some of its symptoms are similar to those of other conditions. As a result the condition can often be misdiagnosed initially as a boil, acne, an infection or folliculitis (inflammation of the hair follicle).3,4

For this reason,after seeing your GP, you may be referred to a dermatologist who specialises in managing and treating skin conditions.

You might find the following resource useful:

SEEING A DERMATOLOGIST ABOUT YOUR HS
Helps you prepare for an appointment with your dermatologist and outlines what you can expect at appointments, whether they are held prior to a diagnosis or once you've been diagnosed with HS.

living-with-hs

LIVING WITH HS

HS may impact everyday life both physically and emotionally. This imapct will vary from person to person depending on a number of factors, including severity and location of HS, but also as each person and their HS is different. Therefore a diagnosis of HS may lead to people feeling a range of emotions. However, there are various coping mechanisms available to support those living with HS.

You might find the following resources useful:

LIVING WITH HS
Provides practical information about living with HS.

TAKING CARE OF SORE SPOTS AND WOUNDS
Provides practical information to support you to take care of sore spots and wounds caused by HS, in discussion with your healthcare professional.

DEALING WITH PAIN ASSOCIATED WITH HS
Provides practical information on how to manage pain associated with HS, in discussion with your healthcare professional.

WHAT IS IT LIKE TO LIVE WITH HS?

Ceri was diagnosed with HS in 2008. In this film, Ceri shares her experience of living with HS and how she has not let HS control her life.

5 QUESTIONS
WE ASKED DR BRIAN MALCOLM ABOUT HS

Dr Brian Malcolm is Associate Specialist and Community Dermatologist, North Devon and has 30 years’ experience in managing HS.

Here are some definitions of phrases you might hear during the films:

Primary care physician:
This is normally the first healthcare professional you might see about your symptoms so it is likely to be your GP

Secondary care physician:
This is a specialist, such as a dermatologist (a doctor who specialises in skin conditions), that your GP may refer you to

Multidisciplinary team:
A group of different types of healthcare professional that work together to treat patients e.g. GPs, dermatologists, nurses might all work together as a multidisciplinary team to care for someone living with HS

Click on the videos below to hear Dr Brian Malcolm’s responses:

1. WHAT IS HS?

2. WHAT SHOULD SOMEONE DO IF THEY THINK THEY HAVE HS?

3. HOW CAN SOMEONE MAKE THE MOST OF THEIR GP CONSULTATION?

4. WHEN SHOULD SOMEONE BE REFERRED TO A SPECIALIST?

5. WHO CAN PROVIDE INFORMATION AND ADVICE ABOUT WOUND CARE AND PAIN MANAGEMENT?

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

ttydSignSymbtoms

Investigate actual examples of the symptoms of HS

FIND OUT MORE

REFERENCES:

  1. Jemec g,et al. Hidradenitis Suppurativa. N Engl J Med. 2012; 366:158-64.
  2. Dufour DN, et al. Hidradenitis suppurativa: a common and burdensome, yet under-recognised, inflammatory skin disease. Postgrad Med J. 2014; 90:216-221.
  3. British Association of Dermatologists Patient Information Leaflet. Hidradenitis Suppurativa. 2013.Available here: http://www.bad.org.uk/shared/get-file.ashx?id=88&itemtype=document. [Last accessed: December 2016]
  4. NHS Choices. Hidradenitis Suppurativa. Available at: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hidradenitis-suppurativa/Pages/Introduction.aspx. [Last accessed: December 2016]   

YOU ARE ABOUT TO LEAVE FOR A 3RD PARTY WEBSITE

You are leaving HS Online to go to a site that is not under the control of AbbVie. AbbVie is not responsible for the content of any such site or any further links from such site. AbbVie is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply the endorsement of the linked site by AbbVie. You should also be aware that the linked site may be governed by its own set of terms and conditions and privacy policy for which AbbVie has no responsibility.

Conversely, the presence of this link does not imply the linked site's endorsement of HS Online or AbbVie.

Do you wish to leave this site?

This site is developed, funded and owned by Abbvie Ltd

Copyright ©2015 AbbVie, Ltd

 

The content on this site has been created solely for UK residents. It is intended for informational purposes only, and should not be used to replace a discussion with a healthcare professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be handled by a healthcare professional, and be made based on the unique needs of each patient.

AXHUD141459(1)a Date of Preparation Feb 2017

This information is intended for healthcare professionals only. Are you a healthcare professional?